The Ultimate LaserTV Test – XXL Comparison 2022

 

The biggest LaserTV Shootout ever!

Home cinema LaserTV sets standards: We had sixteen of the most relevant LaserTVs on the market compete against each other in a large LaserTV test and separated the wheat from the chaff in numerous visual tests and series of measurements. All of this can be seen in great detail in our mammoth video special on YouTube.

At the same time, in this test special, we have again clearly prepared the most important results and data and summarized the strengths and weaknesses of each model in a ranking. The 16 models were examined in detail and all of their strengths and weaknesses were compared in order to keep the ultimate overview of the ever-growing LaserTV landscape. Have fun!

LG Vivo Max alias HU915QE - The reference machine in the XXL LaserTV Test 2022!

VAVA Chroma SP003 - color wonder and film machine

LG Vivo Mini aka HU715QW - TV all-rounder at a reasonable price

Hisense LaserCinema PX1-Pro – RGB price/performance monster

Samsung LSP9T

Hisense L9G

Viewsonic X2000

Samsung LSP7T

VAVA 4K

Optoma UHZ65UST

EPSON EH-LS800

Hisense L5F

XGIMI Aura

Optoma Cinemax D2

BenQ V6000

Xiaomi Mi 4K: No good picture without a suitable screen! Today the canvas makes the picture!


1. LG Vivo Max alias HU915QE - The reference machine in the XXL LaserTV Test 2022!

With the predecessor HU85LS Vivo, LG launched the first real high-end LaserTV, which to date left most of the competition behind and was one of the most popular LaserTVs on the market until last year, despite its high price. LG has now actually managed to defend this top position with the new Vivo Max: In our mega comparison, the Vivo Max again occupies the reference position in most disciplines and is therefore the most mature laser TV of all. 

The Vivo Max is already in a class of its own when it comes to installation : only a total depth of just 50 cm to the wall is required to illuminate a 100" screen, so almost every lowboard on the market is suitable. With its simple, bright design, it also adapts particularly well to modern living rooms. 

There are also no compromises when it comes to equipment: One of the three HDMI inputs has been updated to the latest 2.1 standard and now also offers important gaming support such as 120Hz playback, low input lag of less than 40ms and a special gaming picture menu. This offers coordinated image adjustments, which should offer advantages in different game genres. The operation is identical to conventional LG televisions via the smart user interface WebOS and the associated Magic Remote. The only criticism is the lack of a TV tuner. However, TV apps available in the App Store such as WaipuuTV etc. offer a good alternative.

In terms of image quality, the Vivo Max is the absolute reference in terms of light output: With a maximum of 3700 lumens and 3200 lumens with good colors, it is the best of all participants against extraneous light and is still pleasantly quiet. The combination of 2300:1 native contrast and effective dimming to a dynamic range of up to 15000:1 also gives the picture excellent plasticity (also at reference level).

Reference also in the sharpness and detail display, since the "large" DLP chip with 4 megapixel resolution is used here, which is sequentially doubled to UHD 8 megapixels. The Vivo Max misses the top position in color reproduction alone, because its color space does not completely cover the DCI P3 cinema standard, which is bearable in view of the high light output. In terms of sound quality, the Vivo Max benefits from its volume, in which four chassis have been installed. The result is good volume, high spatiality and good speech intelligibility, and the LaserTV can also transmit the sound wirelessly to external speakers via Bluetooth  (available separately from LG).

All in all, the Vivo Max is the best possible replacement for a TV, offering excellent versatility with reference-level picture quality and great features. With a recommended retail price of around €6000, it also has a princely price.

+ Reference in placement, brightness, resolution and contrast

+ Extensive smart system with gaming optimization

– No TV tuners

– Color space does not meet the DCI P3 standard

 

 

2. VAVA Chroma SP003 - color wonder and film machine

the film machine in the LaserTV test xxl

The Californian startup VAVA is also presenting its second-generation LaserTV with the new “Chroma” (model SP-003) . As the name suggests, the focus was on the most perfect color rendering possible. And this project has succeeded: The Chroma is the only one in the field that has a Quattro light source with separate laser diodes for red, green and blue as well as a special yellow laser / phosphor hybrid channel.

This creates a color space that not only covers the cinema color space DCI P3 with full light output, but also reaches approx. 90% of the BT2020 standard. In addition, the additional laser drastically reduces the annoying "speckle" (glittering) compared to other RGB models in this LaserTV comparison, which means that in practice it is only noticeable with full-surface RGB content.

Technically, this is already a unique selling point, but Vava also cleverly uses this system in signal processing with special color profiles: The VAVA Chroma uses this extended 4-laser color space for all signal sources (SDR, DCI, BT2020) equally, what a color-intensive display that does not appear too pale even under ambient light conditions. Of course, a large color space also harbors the risk that many colors will appear overly colorful, especially facial tones. In fact, that was initially the case with Chroma, but with the last software update 1.8.5, a color profile was integrated that leaves facial colors absolutely natural and only emphasizes strong colors more. This leads to excellent results, regardless of the feed. 

In addition to the complex color system, the VAVA Chroma also shines with the highest native contrast of all participants in this LaserTV test: 3200:1 native ensures a good black value and, above all, a high in-image contrast for HDR content with highlights. A light output of 2200 lumens with the right color temperature and good sharpness including interframe calculation round off the very good performance spectrum. The Chroma is at its best when it comes to film and series material in particular, which makes it a true film machine. 

In terms of features and operation, the VAVA Chroma is rather conventional: it does offer approaches to a smart Android operating system with apps, but these are poorly optimized and so the performance is below the level of specialized / optimized systems such as LG, Samsung or Hisense. We recommend using an external FireTV stick from Amazon or Apple TV.

The VAVA does not have a TV tuner either. In fact, every euro was put into the image performance here, and from our point of view this is a particularly successful approach and cannot be found in any other device in the LaserTV comparison.

 

When it comes to installation, the VAVA Chroma is in the lower midfield of the LaserTV test, its total depth for a 100-inch screen size is around 65 cm, so that you have to move the lowboard a few centimeters away from the wall. When it comes to sound, VAVA is renewing its successful cooperation with Harman Kardon, which pays off in terms of sound quality: With its voluminous and wide sound field, the Chroma can easily keep up with a mid-range soundbar, and the speech intelligibility that is important for films is also given. All in all, it occupies the reference position of all LaserTVs.

The VAVA Chroma SP-003 is recommended for everyone who is looking for a real state-of-the-art LaserTV and places the emphasis on appealing film playback with cinema characteristics. For us, the film machine in the XXL LaserTV test.

+ Very good coloring for each image material

+ Best native contrast of all LaserTVs in comparison

+ one of the few 3D capable devices on the market 

– Not a real smart interface

- Quite a large distance from the wall

 

3. LG Vivo Mini aka HU715QW - TV all-rounder at a reasonable price

Not everyone wants to spend €3,000 to €6,000 on a LaserTV, which is why a significantly lower price range around €2,500 has established itself over the last year. The "Vivo Mini" from LG is also positioned here, the little brother of the Vivo Max reference model from this LaserTV test comparison.

Not only does the Vivo Mini look like a "thin" Vivo from the outside, the model also appears a bit simpler in terms of technology: the RGB laser light source has given way to a conventional laser / phosphor hybrid, the 4 megapixel DLP chip has been replaced by a FullHD chip + 4x pixel shift replaced. Nevertheless, an amazing amount has been taken over from the "big one" without any compromises: HDMI inputs according to the 2.1 standard with versatile gaming support, fully-fledged WebOS Smart operating system of the latest generation etc. etc. In terms of equipment, the Vivo mini is just as versatile a LaserTV as its big brother . You only have to plan a little more distance when setting it up, but with a total depth of 55cm with a 100" screen, the Vivo Mini is also a space-saving model and feels comfortable on almost any lowboard.

In terms of image quality, the Vivo Mini shows a solid performance without any major weaknesses: 2500 lumens with good coloring, very good sharpness with interframe calculation, extended SDR color space, which can also show cinema material well. We would have hoped for a little more in contrast alone, with 2000:1 without switchable dimming it is only in the lower middle field. 

Good results for the sound too: Although a bit slimmed down compared to the Vivo Max, the soundscape is one of the better ones in our XXL LaserTV comparison, with good three-dimensionality and substance. In the bass range, however, the Vivo Mini could have a little more "punch". Like its big brother, it can also supply external LG speakers directly via radio. 

All in all, the LG Vivo Mini is the excellent and inexpensive entry into the world of LaserTV and, thanks to its versatility, the ideal replacement for a conventional television. 

+ Compact dimensions, versatile

+ Extensive smart system with gaming optimization

– No TV tuners

– Color space does not meet the DCI P3 standard

 

 

4. Hisense LaserCinema PX1-Pro – RGB price/performance monster

The PX1 Pro from Hisense is one of the big LaserTV surprises of the year and is steadily gaining popularity in the USA and Europe. The reason: While all other real RGB LaserTVs on the market and in this LaserTV test cost over €3500, the PX-1 Pro has one for just over €2000. However, a little was saved in other places.

The image display focuses on the colors, Hisense promises full BT2020 coverage. Our measurements prove this, in fact the PX1 Pro is in the same class as a Samsung The Premiere or Hisense L9G. What's more, the color profiles of the PX1 Pro are even better matched ex works, so that it can also cope very well with SDR or DCI P3 feature films.

But the RGB light source also has its side effect: strong glittering in homogeneous areas and color fringes at strong contrast transitions disturb the visual impression somewhat, even if the image sharpness including interframe calculation can be described as good overall. The dynamic range could also be a bit higher, with 1400:1 the black value looks rather greyish in dark scenes. The light output, on the other hand, is decent at 2200:1 lumen with good colors. 

The sound reproduction has a good three-dimensionality, but is a bit weak and a bit tinny with deep basses. The acoustic experience is roughly on par with a cheap entry-level soundbar.

Hisense does not call the PX1 Pro LaserTV, but LaserCinema. And that's a good thing, because with its image display, the PX1 Pro is well equipped for feature films, less so for daily television. Overall, it offers an excellent price/performance ratio and is a highlight in this LaserTV test.

+ RGB Laser with 100% BT2020 coverage

+ price / performance breaker

– Limited contrast

– Laser artifacts (glitter / color fringes)

5. Samsung LSP9T

The Samsung LSP9T is now two years old and was the world's first LaserTV with a true RGB laser light source in 2020. This was groundbreaking and even today the Samsung is one of the best LaserTVs, even if it is not entirely without weaknesses from today's perspective...

Its RGB laser light source allows it to have superb color coverage of all standards, from SDR / BT709, to UHD Premium with DCI P3 cinema color space, to BT2020, which covers almost all color tones visible to humans. The Samsung displays the last two standards excellently, but conventional TV / series material appears unnatural and reddish oversaturated in many areas. Only a complex calibration by a specialist can help here. Like the other 3 RGB LaserTVs, the Samsung also shows strong glitter (speckle) and color fringes. Thanks to the 4 megapixel DLP chip, its sharpness is still excellent and with good interframe calculation even when it is moving. Its brightness is very good at 2700 real lumens, but with a native contrast of 2200:1 it is only in the midfield.

When it comes to installation and equipment, the experience of the world's largest TV manufacturer is evident: only 52 cm deep with a 100" screen, triple tuner with SmartCard reader and the smart "Tizen" operating system with all relevant streaming apps. The Samsung is equal to a conventional TV in all respects.

That leaves the sound, where "The Premiere" is also in the upper third: good sound volume, differentiated sound field, only in the bass range it can't quite keep up with the front runners from the test. 

Even after two years, the Samsung LSP9T is still part of the reference class, even if it is the first RGB LaserTV to still show typical side effects and calibration by a professional is essential.

+ RGB Laser with 100% BT2020 coverage

+ High detail resolution thanks to large DMD chips with 4 million pixels

– Contrast limited

– Laser artifacts (glitter / color fringes)

 

 

6. Hisense L9G

The little brother of the Hisense L9G, the L5F (further down in the LaserTV test), was the first named "LaserTV" in this country and has made a name for itself with its good features: triple tuner with smart card reader and a completely smart operating system " VIDAA" make it identical to a conventional television of the same brand in terms of equipment and operation. The high-end version L9G comes with a new chassis and RGB laser. Compared to its brother, this equipment costs around €1,500 more.

At 63 cm, the distance is quite ample, but it can still be achieved with most lowboards. Like all LaserTVs from Hisense, with the exception of the PX-1 Pro, there is no sharpness control on the L9G either, you have to decide on one of the screens offered when you buy it, but it is included in the delivery at no extra charge. All these properties also apply to the little brother L5F, the difference between the two models lies primarily in the light engine, more precisely in the light source. While the L5F is a conventional laser/phosphor LaserTV, the L9G features true RGB lasers, resulting in a much wider color gamut over the BT2020 standard.

This is particularly evident in UHD premium feature films, where the L5F with its slightly expanded BT709 color space appears noticeably paler and also greenish, so extensive calibration is recommended. The L9G, on the other hand, shines in magnificent colors that you have never seen on a television: rich green, deep red, there is no color nuance that it cannot produce. The L9G is also a bit ahead in the calibrated brightness with 2700 lumens and is one of the brighter ones in the test field.

But the L5F is also bright and suitable for daylight with 2400 calibrated lumens. In contrast, both weaken a bit natively with approx. 2000:1 without dimming, they are not black value miracles. Optical sharpness and signal processing is equally good for both. In terms of sound quality, both models only occupy the midfield, their integrated soundbars lack the bass foundation and differentiation in voice reproduction. 

Both models are recommended for those who are really looking for a TV replacement in terms of features and reception. The L9G has some advantages in movie playback due to its great colors. 

+ Triple tuner & real smart surface

+ Great RGB colors with BT2020 color space

– No optical focus control

– Limited contrast

7. Viewsonic X2000

Viewsonic is known in the beamer market for its solid but inexpensive home cinema projectors, and the Taiwanese group apparently wants to establish this reputation in the laser TV market as well. From a purely visual point of view, the “X2000” is undoubtedly the most unusual LaserTV in the test field, with a separate loudspeaker roll on the front, which is strongly reminiscent of Bluetooth loudspeakers from JBL. But behind the sound system is none other than Harman Kardon, the parent company of JBL, and the sound quality, which is among the best of all LaserTVs in this LaserTV comparison, is correspondingly mature, just behind the Harman Kardon systems of the VAVA Chroma.

Like many other manufacturers, Viewsonic also builds on Android when it comes to the operating system, and a trend seems to be emerging here, as with cell phones. In the case of the Viewsonic, the implementation is quite successful, even if apps for streaming function rather rudimentarily. However, we still see external solutions such as FireTV or Apple TV at an advantage. With a total depth of 59 cm and a 100-inch screen, the X2000 can just about be placed on most lowboards.

The image quality is consistently solid: Especially with its contrast ratio of 2700:1 with calibrated colors, the Viewsonic is at the forefront in terms of image vividness. On the "bright" side, however, it is a bit limited at 2200 lumens, so it cannot tolerate bright sunlight. In terms of color, it cuts a fine figure, with full SDR color space coverage and a slightly expanded color space for HDR cinema films. Its lens allows for good sharpness with only a small fall-off towards the corners, the interframe calculation works pleasantly subtle, without artefacts.

The Viewsonic X2000 could develop from an underdog to a darling of the public, because with its extraordinary design, great sound and solid picture quality with a good black level, it is fun right away and is a real surprise in our XXL LaserTV comparison

+ Impressive sound quality from Harman Kardon

+ Solid image quality

– No DCI P3 color space coverage

– Limited light output

 

8. Samsung LSP7T

Parallel to Samsung "The Premiere", a cheaper model also came onto the market, which is also still available after two years. It has been slimmed down a bit in various areas, but still offers a solid performance. 

With a distance from the wall / front edge of 65 cm, it needs significantly more depth than its big brother and is only at the bottom of the field in terms of installation. On the other hand, there are no compromises when it comes to equipment, with a triple tuner, "Tizen" smart interface, good workmanship and an attractive design, it completely replaces a conventional TV if necessary and also leaves many other participants in the field behind. 

Typical LaserTV results are achieved in terms of image quality, without any major weaknesses, but also without any highlights: 2200 lumens with good colors, a slightly expanded color space for DCI P3 films, good sharpness with interframe calculation. In terms of contrast, it works natively with 1500:1 and is one of the few that even has dynamic dimming, but only with complex calibration of the corresponding mode. It's a pity that the LSP7T is hardly sold in this way due to the lack of a specialist trade concept. 

In terms of sound technology, the Samsung can also replace a conventional TV, but does not particularly stand out acoustically in our XXL comparison. 

All in all, the Samsung LSP7T is a solid, reliable and good, but also rather "boring" LaserTV from our XXL LaserTV test field, but worth a look for all conservative TV viewers.

+ Full smart interface

+ Triple Tuner

– Only SDR color space

– Low native contrast

9. VAVA 4K

The Vava 4K has become a real classic: With its great “Apple-like” design and simple operation, it has found many fans and is still in production. Rightly so as we find... 

From the outside, its workmanship and simplicity, which adapts to any living room ambience, are convincing. It is one of the few models available in either black or white. By today's standards, however, its equipment is a bit simple: no smart operating system, no TV tuner. When set up, it requires a total depth of 60 cm with a 100" picture size, so it can be accommodated on most standard lowboards.

In terms of image technology, the secret of its success is the uniform color mode with a slightly expanded color space, which makes the Vava 4K appear somewhat stronger in color without making facial colors appear unnatural. His picture looks more appealing, especially under the remaining conditions. It also mixes with the top devices in terms of image dynamics with a native contrast of 3000:1 and its brightness of 2300 lumens with good colors is also sufficient. In terms of sharpness, on the other hand, one notices its age: it falls off a bit in edge sharpness and its signal processing comes without interframe calculation, converting feature films to 60Hz. For TV material there is a manual 50Hz switch to avoid jerking.

In terms of sound, it clearly belongs to the reference, thanks to the Harman Kardon sound system: voluminous and powerful bass, but the voice reproduction could be clearer. When it comes to movies, the sound does a very good job!

The Vava 4K is still recommended for those who are looking for an attractive and easy-to-configure LaserTV all-rounder.

+ Impressive sound quality from Harman Kardon

+ Bright and appealing colors with very good contrast 

– No interframe calculation

– Operating system somewhat antiquated

10. Optoma UHZ65UST

At Optoma, LaserTVs are actually in their third generation, which is why we are testing the first model (UHZ65) and the latest model (Cinemax D2) in this LaserTV review. The models do not differ from the outside in terms of looks, the same chassis is used. However, the inner values ​​have changed significantly in some cases.

First to the similarities: The Optomas are the largest LaserTVs in this test, so they need a correspondingly large low board. At the same time, they require the greatest total depth of 67.5 cm with a 100" screen, which is no longer up to date. Both also lack a smart operating system, but with the D2 you can at least buy it as a smart version for an additional €100, but we recommend FireTV or AppleTV because they are better optimized. 

In terms of brightness, the UHZ65UST is one of the brightest in this LaserTV comparison. With 2700 lumens and good colors, it is without a doubt suitable for use in daylight (provided you have the right screen). The UHZ65UST has a powerful interframe calculation that copes well with most content. Artifacts can creep in with more complex images. In contrast, it works natively with a dynamic range of 1500:1, which can be stretched to almost 7000:1 by dimming. This results in a very appealing black level even in dark movie scenes. The color space covers SDR / 709 and is slightly expanded for UHD premium films. 

In terms of sound quality, the UHZ65UST has a powerful sound thanks to its Nuforce sound system, which only weakens when it comes to voice reproduction. Overall, it builds up a broad soundscape with a good frequency response. As the owner of the few models, it is almost inaudibly quiet ventilation, here it occupies the reference position. As one of the few LaserTVs on the market, it is also 3D-capable, which should make cineastes with a 3D film collection very happy.

+ Extremely quiet chassis

+ High light output

+ 3D capable

– No DCI P3 color space coverage

– Large wall distance required

 

 

 

11. EPSON EH-LS800

Epson is known to be an advocate of LCD projector technology and accordingly the LS800 is the only LCD representative among the test candidates. At the same time, it is a 3-chip projector, which enables a particularly smooth picture. 

With up to 4000 lumens, the Epson LS800 is also the brightest LaserTV in this LaserTV comparison, at least on paper. We measured and in "Dynamic" mode the LS800 actually reached the mark, but only with a strong green cast. If the coloring is correct, around 40% is lost and 2200 lumens remain, so that the Epson “net” only ends up in midfield. The native contrast also drops from 2000:1 to 1100:1, the lowest value among all participants. After all, the LS800 has dynamic dimming that "boosts" the contrast to around 4000:1, but the bottom line is that the black value remains in dark movie scenes disappointing.

The color space is limited to SDR/BT709, so that TV material has adequate colors, but UHD movies are a bit too pale. Sharpness and interframe calculation are on a good level, but the lower pixel contrast of the LCD technology makes the image of the LS800 look softer than that of the DLP competition, a question of taste.

When set up, the Epson is excellent and only requires a total depth of 52.5 cm.

This means that it can also be placed on narrow lowboards, but its enormous length still makes it appear "mighty". It also uses an Android-based smart system, and Epson did the best job of implementing this out of all the participants. 

The sound quality provided by the sound system provided by Yamaha is simply disappointing: It offers little space and everything sounds "tinny", the speech intelligibility also leaves a lot to be desired. It's a pity, technically more would have been possible in this large chassis and thus a better placement in this LaserTV test would have been possible...

+ Very small distance from the wall

+ High maximum brightness

– Low native contrast

– High loss of light due to calibration

12. Hisense L5F

The Hisense L5 was the first named "LaserTV" in this country and made a name for itself with its good equipment: triple tuner with smart card reader and a completely smart operating system "VIDAA" make it identical to a conventional television in terms of equipment and operation own brand. 

At 63 cm, the distance is quite ample, but it can still be achieved with most lowboards. Like all LaserTVs from Hisense, there is no focus control on the L5F either, you have to decide on one of the screens offered when you buy it, which is included in the delivery at no extra charge. All these properties also apply to the big brother L9G, the difference between the two models lies primarily in the light engine, more precisely in the light source. While the L5F is a conventional laser/phosphor LaserTV, the L9G features true RGB lasers, resulting in a much larger color space.

This is particularly evident in UHD premium feature films, where the L5F with its slightly expanded BT709 color space appears noticeably paler and also greenish, so extensive calibration is recommended. The L9G, on the other hand, shines in magnificent colors that you have never seen on a television: rich green, deep red, there is no color nuance that it cannot produce. The L9G is also a bit ahead in the calibrated brightness with 2700 lumens and is one of the brighter ones in the test field.

 

 

But the L5F is also bright and suitable for daylight with 2400 calibrated lumens. In contrast, both weaken a bit natively with approx. 2000:1 without dimming, they are not black value miracles. Optical sharpness and signal processing is equally good for both. In terms of sound quality, both models only occupy the midfield, their integrated soundbars lack the bass foundation and sophistication in the voice. 

Both models are recommended for those who are really looking for a TV replacement in terms of features and reception. The L9G has some advantages in movie playback due to its great colors. 

+ Triple tuner & true smart interface

+ Many connections

– audible fan in operation

– No optical focus control

– Limited contrast

13.XGIMI Aura

With the XGIMI Aura we come back to an exotic that is mainly sold online. On the brochure photos it looks unusual and yet elegant, but we were surprised by the extreme size of the chassis when we held it in our hands live... Definitely one of the largest in the XXL LaserTV comparison.

But the size also has advantages: The Xgimi Aura offers a lot of resonance space, so that the integrated Harman Kardon sound system can perform at its best. Together with the Vava LaserTVs, the Aura4K easily takes the lead, a separate soundbar is definitely not necessary.

The image quality, on the other hand, is rather mediocre: 2000 lumens with good colors, good sharpness including interframe calculation and a color space tailored to SDR / BT709 without extensions for feature films / UHD Premium. Its native contrast of 30001:1 is above average. All in all, we couldn't identify any major weaknesses.

When it comes to operation, we encounter an Android system again, which is spreading more and more among LaserTVs from China. As with the others in this LaserTV test, it is functional, but not perfectly optimized for the projector... the well-known TV manufacturers such as LG, Hisense and Samsung can do that much better!

+ Impressive sound quality from Harman Kardon

+ High contrast

– No DCI P3 color space coverage

– large distance from the wall

14. Optoma Cinemax D2

At Optoma, LaserTVs are actually in their third generation, which is why we compared the first model (UHZ65) and the latest model (D2) in this special. The models do not differ from the outside in terms of looks, the same chassis is used. However, the inner values ​​have changed a lot in some cases... First to the similarities: The Optomas are the largest LaserTVs in this test, so they need a correspondingly large low board.

At the same time, they require the greatest total depth of 67.5 cm with a 100" screen, which is no longer up to date.

Both also lack a smart operating system, but with the D2 you can at least buy it as a smart version for an additional €100, but we recommend FireTV or AppleTV because they are better optimized. 

In terms of brightness, the UHZ65UST is one of the brightest, with 2700 lumens and good colors it is undoubtedly suitable for daylight (assuming the appropriate screen). Unfortunately, this has been reduced with the D2 to save costs, the D2 achieves 2200 lumens and thus only lands in the midfield. The signal processing has also been slimmed down: while the UHZ65UST calls its own powerful interframe calculation, the D2 lacks it entirely. In the other disciplines, on the other hand, nothing has changed: They work natively with a dynamic range of 1500:1, which can be stretched to almost 7000:1 by dimming. This results in a very appealing black level even in dark movie scenes. The color space covers SDR / 709 and is slightly expanded for UHD premium films. 

In terms of sound quality, the UHZ65UST is ahead again thanks to its Nuforce sound system, it builds up a broad soundscape with a good frequency response, the D2 seems significantly thinner here. What both models have in common is the almost inaudibly quiet ventilation, here they occupy the reference position in the LaserTV comparison.

+ Extremely quiet chassis

+ 3D capable

+ cheap price

– No interframe calculation

– No DCI P3 color space coverage

– very thin sound

15. BenQ V6000

When the Taiwanese manufacturer BenQ announced its first LaserTV, the home cinema world was excited. BenQ currently produces some of the best and, above all, most precise home cinema DLP projectors at fair prices. This concept was also to be transferred to the V6000:

Perfect color fidelity as the filmmakers intended, true 24p reproduction. Good contrast (1500:1 native, 7000:1 dynamic), high light output (2800 lumens with good colors), interframe calculation, special DCI color filter, etc. etc.. In terms of image technology, there is a lot that speaks for the BenQ V6000. 

And the design of the V6000 is also appealing: high-quality workmanship, beautiful optics and an automatic protective plate that closes when not in use and protects the optical unit from dust and external influences. 

With all the attention to detail in terms of picture and chassis, however, the "TV" aspect has unfortunately been forgotten in terms of installation and equipment: the V6000 is the only LaserTV that does not have any geometry correction, only a typical beamer trapezoid correction is available, but this is not sufficient in most cases , because a LaserTV can almost never be perfectly aligned mechanically. This is actually a KO criterion, which prevents the success of the device. In terms of streaming and operation, the V6000 also relies exclusively on external players, it behaves like a pure monitor.

When it comes to sound, the BenQ scores with its HiFi-like treVolo sound system. A good soundscape with a balanced balance is shown here, which is particularly convincing with music, but for films it lacks a bit of bass foundation and dynamics.

In terms of image technology, the V6000 is close to a real cinema projector and could have developed into the LaserTV for film enthusiasts if it hadn't stumbled over the installation and the rather high operating noise. However, all experienced do-it-yourselfers who dare to achieve absolute perfection in the installation can access it.

BenQ V6000 OHNE DCI Filter
BenQ V6000 MIT DCI Filter

+ Precise color representation

+ Good signal processing

– No geometry correction

– Little light output with DCI P3

 

 

16. Xiaomi Mi 4K

The Xiaomi brand is known in this country for its mobile phones, but the Chinese electronics giant also produces LaserTVs that are sold under a wide variety of brand labels. The "Mi 4k" is sold under its own name and should convince above all in terms of price. Of all the models in this LaserTV test, the Mi4K is by far the smallest and looks dainty even on narrow lowboards. With a total depth of 56 cm and a total depth of 100", it really requires little space, so that it is almost predestined for smaller living spaces.

The ventilation is surprisingly quiet, but it is drowned out by a clearly audible whistling, which can be perceived as annoying in practice. The rest of the equipment is rather economical with a rudimentary Smart operating system and a simple plastic housing. 

There are few surprises when it comes to image quality: at 1500 lumens with good colours, it's the darkest in the field and needs controlled lighting conditions, but then appears "bright" enough. The sharpness is good, but falls off a bit towards the edges, the interframe calculation is usable, but not free of errors. The absolute KO criterion is the lack of 50Hz compatibility: The Mi4K always converts the frame rate internally to 60Hz, which leads to annoying jerking during sports broadcasts and TV shows. The color display is primarily optimized for SDR content, there is no extended color space for DCI-P3 feature films, and no adjustments can be made due to the lack of color management. The contrast ratio is really excellent at 2700:1 with good color reproduction. 

Considering the size, the sound volume is surprisingly full, but we miss space and, especially with movies, bass. As with all LaserTVs, better than normal TVs, but does not replace a surround system.

The Xiaomi Mi4K is the frugal budget model in this LaserTV test, but we recommend spending a little more money and going for the Hisense PX1 or LG Vivo mini, mainly because of the 50Hz problem.

+ Very compact

+ Low price

– Low light output

– 50Hz playback only with jerking

– annoying whistling noise

The color space of the Xiaomi Mi almost reaches the BT709 standard

No good picture without a suitable screen! Today the canvas makes the picture!

At this point we would like to emphasize once again that a LaserTV can only become an alternative to a conventional television if a suitable CLR / ALR screen is used. These special screens absorb extraneous light coming in at an angle and thus ensure high contrasts even in rooms that are not darkened. You can also find a suitable video on our YouTube channel:

The selection of LaserTV screens is just as large as with LaserTVs themselves and each screen offers different properties that can harmonize better or worse with the respective LaserTVs. 

A personal direct comparison with the personal LaserTV favorite is also essential here. But don't worry, the designated LaserTV specialist dealers have the best models ready for demonstration and will be happy to advise you!

Source: https://heimkino-lasertv.de/2022/11/24/der-ultimative-lasertv-test-2022/